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Take Action, Not Children

August 20th, 2018 by jacqueline

Inspiring day bringing ‘Mylar For Disco, Not Deportation’ to the Chicago Loop Alliance Activate, an interactive pubic art installation to drive awareness to the plight of the 2,300 border children ripped from their parents. Under the shimmering light of hundreds of Mylar blankets, Chicagoans came together to write hundreds of cards of hope and love.

Please take a moment to help brighten the day for a child. Write one note or thousands — anything uplifting in English or Spanish or just draw a happy picture — and send to: UAC/ORR Program, ATTN: Cards for Kids, 330 C Street, SW, 5th Floor, D.C. 20201

Suggested message: Yo y mis amigos quisiéramos decirte que estamos pensando en ti y tu familia y que estamos trabajando para una mejor situación para ustedes.

Translation: My friends and I would like to tell you that we are thinking of you and your family and that we are working for a better situation for you.

#FamiliesBelongTogether #GatherActivism #MylarForDiscoNotDeportation

Origins of the Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge

August 13th, 2018 by jacqueline

Hundreds of schools across the nation have suffered horrific gun violence since Sandy Hook. 7K kids have been gunned down. More than 187K have been traumatized. Enough is ENOUGH.

Armed with nothing more than torn fabric and boxes of chalk, students staged a public art protest in Washington Square Park, aka Bughouse Square, ground zero to Chicago’s radical free speech movement. Over the course of a month, students from across Chicago came together to tie 7,000 pieces of orange fabric strips onto the fence to represent all the kids gunned down since Sandy Hook and 1,300 notes of hope to represent all the kids who died last year alone. When rain washed the hopes away, students returned with 1,300 more notes, plus orange flowers planted in bullet casings and clear plastic backpacks. For over a month, community members wrote and rewrote the nearly 300 school names — the sidewalk chalk protest stretched an entire city block.

But when a pro-gun organization petitioned to set up a counter-protest, instead of promoting still more free speech, the Washington Park Advisory Council voted to crush it. The morning of the scheduled Earth Day Spring Clean-up, a sympathetic council member woke before dawn to save our fabric.

That very day, community members reinstalled the project at CPS Nettelhorst Elementary in East Lakeview, instantly rewriting the nearly 300 school names.

Proof positive that the young people will win.

Hector Duarte takes the Schools Say Enough Challenge

August 13th, 2018 by jacqueline

Acclaimed artist Hector Duarte takes the Schools Say Enough Challenge in front of the National Museum of Mexican Art. His chalk butterfly honors the victims of the Sal Castro Middle School tragedy. How does a 12-year-old get access to a gun? Take the Challenge and sign the petition#Enough

Since moving to Chicago in 1985, Duarte has participated in the creation of more than 45 murals. He has received a number of awards, including a 1995 Chicago Bar Association Award for best work of public art and a 1994 National Endowment for the Arts project grant. Duarte is the co-founder of the Julio Ruelas Print Workshop in Zacatecas, Mexico, La Casa de la Cultura in Zamora, Mexico, and Taller Mestizarte in Chicago.

Wear Orange Schools Say Enough Challenge, Hadiya Pendleton Park

August 12th, 2018 by jacqueline

JUN 2, 2018 —  Everytown for Gun Safety hosted a Wear Orange event in Hadiya Pendleton Park. While #WearOrange events happened all over the country, the Chicago event a public art project called The Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge. All the details are on the change.org petition.

Read the complete EdPost blog right here.

The Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge: Schurz High School

August 12th, 2018 by jacqueline

MAY 8, 2018 — The Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge traveled to Schurz High School for the Northside Maker Faire. We were blown away when a blind man wrote a word for the world to see.

Please throw our change.org petition far and wide. #Enough

If you’ve got a piece of chalk, you’ve got a voice.

We vow to keep shouting from our sidewalks until TPTB listen.

The People Won: Dan Ryan Shut Down

August 12th, 2018 by jacqueline

JUL 8, 2018 — Thousands of protesters shut down the Dan Ryan expressway and took the Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge. Thrilled to stand with our city on the right side of history. Epic. #Enough #ChicagoStrong #DanRyanShutDown

ABC’s live video and tag, “Some children among the protesters used chalk to write, “Love” and “Enough is enough” on the roadway of the Dan Ryan,” hit the AP wire and traveled round the world and back again.

ABC live video of Chalk Challenge; also included in ABC full coverage and the Chicago SunTimes.

Chalk Protest at CPS Montessori School of Englewood

August 12th, 2018 by jacqueline

On May 16th, CPS Montessori School of Englewood took the Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge. Deeply honored and humbled to have spent the day helping to amplify the powerful voices of TMSOE students and teachers fighting for change.

The protest was covered by NBC and the Chicago Sun-Times.

Please sign the petition! https://chn.ge/2L5bJJC

Lake Shore Drive Covered in Chalk

August 12th, 2018 by jacqueline

AUG 9, 2018 —

Last week, hundreds of protesters took the Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge and scrawled messages of hope and love on Lake Shore Drive and in front of Wrigley Field.

The voices are diverse and sometimes messy, but the message across our great city is singular and clear:

Enough is Enough. Stop the Killing. One Chicago. 

Here’s the direct link to the Sun-Times video.

Complete Chicago Sun-Times coverage of the protest.

Lane Tech Walkout: Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge

August 12th, 2018 by jacqueline

JUN 5, 2018 — 

As #WearOrange events happened all over the country, hundreds of CPS Lane Tech College Prep students walked out of class to take The Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge. The student body chalked the names of schools that have suffered horrific gun violence since Sandy Hook. All 292 of them.

Students organizers looked out over a sea of names and offered these remarks:

According to CNN, a “school shooting” consists of, shooting that involved at least one person being shot (not including the shooter) and that occurred on school grounds. This includes grades kindergarten through college/university, gang violence, fights, domestic violence, and accidental discharge of a firearm, if, the first two guidelines are met. If we follow this definition, then there have been 23 school shootings in the 21 weeks of 2018.

CNN also has an article called, “Deadliest Mass Shootings in Modern U.S. History Fast Facts.” This article is less of an article, and more of a list. It lists 35 shootings from 1949 to 2018. The saddest part about this article, is that it is May, and the list has been updated twice already, once for Santa Fe, and once for Parkland. Both of these shootings are school shootings. The Parkland shooting, which occurred on February 14th, 2018 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, took the lives of 14 students and 3 teachers. Recently, on May 18th, 2018 at Santa Fe High School, a gunman took the lives of 8 students and 2 teachers.

These two shootings alone, took 27 lives.

27 innocent lives. 27 people who will no longer get to spread their joy. 27 people who won’t get to have a future. They took 22 students. 22 students who will never get to graduate. 22 students who will never go to college. 22 students who will never have families of their own. And, they took 5 teachers. 5 teachers who will never teach again. 5 teachers who will never grade another paper. 5 teachers who students will miss.

These people who died, should be the last. It is time to make change in this country, so that weapons of mass destruction won’t be in the hands of civilians, because if no change is made, how many more lives will be lost? How many more dreams will no longer be dreamed? How many futures will never get to be lived out?

Now, a common question that lingers in the back of many student’s minds is, “what would happen if I died in a school shooting?

Sadly, this is something that has become common in society today, and when we truly think about the question, the answers tend to range from heartbreaking, to inspiring. If I die in a school shooting, what happens to the life I could’ve lived? I will have no chance of a future. I’ll never be able to get married. I’ll never be able to graduate, never get to experience any freedom, or get to see the world. My life will be gone. I won’t get a redo. I will be done. My life, my dreams, my aspirations, and my hopes will all be gone. If I die in a school shooting, I hope that people who are ignorant will realize that these guns that they’re protecting kill people. Moreover, they kill children.

If I die in a school shooting, everyone would be sad, but would not be surprised. They would want to know why me, why I was killed but they would not be surprised. They would want justice for my death. They would have unthinkable anger and sadness but would not be surprised. They would miss me, would want to hear me say “I love you” one more time, but they wouldn’t be able to.

If I die in a school shooting, it will be the usual. News. Media. Interview. Funeral. Debates. Thoughts and prayers. I will be another statistic. My friends, if they survive, will want justice but understand that it will never come. If I die in a school shooting, my little brother won’t have a sister to play with. If I die in a school shooting, I would hope that I told my sister and my dad I loved them when I left the house and that I hugged my mom when she dropped me off. I hope that that morning I was able to show my family and friends how much I loved them so that saying goodbye wouldn’t be as hard. If I die in a school shooting I hope they know how much I love them more than anything else in this world. If I die in a school shooting, I hope I didn’t die for nothing. I hope that my death causes change. If I die in a school shooting I won’t get to change the world, fall in love, experience what life has to offer. I’ll be another name on the lips of those who will forget me the next time it happens. If I die in a school shooting, I’ll never know what the world had in store for me.

If I die in a school shooting, it’ll just be another day in America. If I die in a school shooting, maybe our leaders will finally do something about gun violence.

If I die in a school shooting, plaster my face onto gun reform posters. Fight for change, please don’t let me become another statistic. If I die in a school shooting, don’t pray for my family, for anyone’s family. Pray that soon enough the laws change for the better, that guns are banned, that schools become safe. Pray that students no longer have to walk out of their houses wondering if they will be able to make it back home, because I know, I feel, we may be next. If I die in a school shooting, tell my parents I love them.

Tell the politicians who are still taking money from the NRA that my blood is on their hands. If I die in a school shooting, my mother will have no one left. If I die in a school shooting, I want my body mailed to the White House with the price of gun that killed me taped to my chest. If I die in a school shooting, I want the world to remember, but continue to go on.

I hope I’m the only one who gets hurt because I can’t imagine any other people at my school dying from something so awful. It should be me and nobody else because I wouldn’t be able to live on, knowing that someone in my school died in a shooting. If I die in a school shooting, I would not be able to hug my dad one last time. I would not be able to tell my mom how much I love her. I would not be able to support my sister with all her aspirations. I would not be able to have a first love. I would not be able to have children or a job. I would not be able to travel, or even go outside one last time and appreciate what’s around me. It would all be taken by a bullet.

This is what students think about, when all we should be worried about is finals and getting good grades.

The lack of gun control in this country has lead to this fear, because it is the lack of control that has lead to these shootings.

National Die-In Chicago

August 12th, 2018 by jacqueline

On June 13, students across the nation took part in a National Die-In to honor the victims of mass shooting since the Pulse Nightclub massacre. The die-in lasted 12 minutes — 720 seconds to honor the 720 mass shooting victims since Pulse.

Protests in Chicago, Nashville, Des Moines and Philadelphia added the Schools Say Enough Sidewalk Challenge to their protests, writing the names mass shooting victims and affected schools in rainbow chalk.

Powerful day.

CBS: https://www.facebook.com/cbschicago/videos/10156674759333338/

Safe & Peaceful Chicago photos: https://www.facebook.com/pg/safepeacefulchi/photos/?tab=album&album_id=2089666777948656

Nettelhorst School | Nettelhorst Community Group | Rowman & Littlefield Publishing, Inc.